Please vote in the 2016 elections

The Right to Suffrage or Suffer

INQUIRER PHOTO NINO JESUS ORBETA

After living in Singapore for over 12 years and witnessing 3 general elections here, I have come to understand the power of every person’s vote.

When I first moved to Singapore, I thought the city-state was perfect: highly efficient systems, clean sidewalks, orderly and well-mannered people. Everything worked. This was the by-product of a motivated, disciplined and focused government.

The first Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, once famously said:

“We (Singapore) would not have made the economic progress if we (the government) had not intervened on very personal matters. Who your neighbour is, how you live, the noise you make, how you spit or where you spit.”

However, after over 40 years of hyper growth under a domineering government, Singaporeans wanted a change: they wanted more input into the policies that govern the country and their own lives. During the 2011 election, they spoke with their vote: the People’s Action Party (PAP), the ruling party since the country’s independence in 1965, lost seats in Parliament.

While the PAP still owned the majority of the Parliamentary seats, they experienced the lowest margin of victory in 46 years. This was their wake-up call.

After the 2011 election, the PAP went to work: they held town halls with business leaders, engaged with the citizens on social media, consulted grass roots organizations, and created forums to listen to Singaporeans.

Change happened. New policies were implemented. And in the recent 2015 General Elections, the PAP won nearly 70 per cent of the popular vote, the highest percentage of votes since 2001. It was a clear mandate from the people that they were doing a good job.

The people were heard and the government reacted positively.

Commision of Elections RP

BeamAndGo encourages Filipinos around the world to register and exercise their right to suffrage in the 2016 Presidential Elections.

Now in 9 months, the Philippine presidential election will take place. If you are happy with what’s happening in the country, vote. If you are unhappy, vote. If you are unsure, vote. Even if you are OFW and not living the Philippines, vote.

Here’s why …

If you vote on May 9, 2016, you will be forcing the government to listen to you. What you write in Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and other social media channels will mean something; the leaders will need to pay attention.

Your vote is a politician’s currency. If you don’t vote, then whatever ideas or complaints or issues you have are meaningless to a politician. You won’t matter to them.

Plus voting is not a hard thing to do. It only takes two steps:

Step 1. Register to vote. You only have until October 31, 2015, to register as a voter or validate your biometrics data for the 2016 presidential, national, and local elections. For more information, go to http://www.rappler.com/nation/politics/elections/2016/98510-voter-registration-primer-2016-elections

Step 2. On May 9, 2016, go to an election polling station and cast your vote for whom you think will do the best job leading the Philippines.

Remember: your vote is critical in making the Philippines the best that it can be.

Delivering on Promises He Made to His Country

If you have not heard, Lee Kuan Yew died this past week on March 23, 2015. And if you don’t know who he is, Lee Kuan Yew is the first Prime Minister of Singapore and the man chiefly responsible for what Singapore is today.

I have lived in Singapore for the past 12 years and here’s the deal: it’s safe here for everyone; it’s clean; efficient – everything works; no corruption; very little traffic; emphasis on education; continual uplifting. I love living here. I chew gum; I have freedom of speech; I respect others and others respect me.

Find that rainbow, GO RIDE IT

Singapore as a country shows what is possible for any country

Lee Kuan Yew envisioned this possibility and had the determination, perseverance and will to get it done. His views reflected his beliefs and his actions delivered on the promises he made to his country: stability, economic growth, jobs, a thriving metropolis, education for all, and harmony between all races and religions.

To say Lee Kuan Yee was a “great man” is the truth. The scope of his insights, his policies and the resulting product went beyond Singapore during his tenure as the country’s founding Prime Minister. His influence and intellect inspired global leaders till the day he died and will have a profound positive effect on future generations throughout the world.

I urge you to read more about him: his history and more importantly, his views. Just google “Lee Kuan Yew” or visit http://www.rememberingleekuanyew.sg/ and you will find ample reading.

Also feel free to share this with your friends and family.